Bunions Everything You Need To Learn

Overview

Bunions

A bunion is a bony bump on the joint at the base of your big toe. The bony growth on the joint sometimes causes your big toe to Bunion Surgery at Nuffield Health Hospitalsturn in towards your second toe. Symptoms include pain, swelling of your big toe and, as the bunion sticks out, it can often rub on the inside of your shoe. The cause is not always known, there may be a deformity of the joint, called hallux valgus (hallux means big toe, valgus means bent outwards). Or it can be as simple as ill fitting footwear not allowing enough width to fit the toes in their natural position. Sometimes bunions are associated with arthritis in the joint at the base of your big toe. Left untreated bunions can continue to grow and become more painful.

Causes

The underlying cause is a deformity of the joint at the base of the big toe. The deformity is called hallux valgus. In this deformity the joint develops a prominent sideways angle. Due to this deformity the bones of the big toe are pushed towards the smaller toes. The skin over the angled joint then tends to rub on the inside of shoes. This may cause thickening and inflammation of the overlying skin and tissues next to the affected joint. In most cases it is not clear why a hallux valgus deformity develops. There may be some hereditary (genetic) tendency to have a weakness of this joint. In some cases it is associated with a joint problem such as osteoarthritis or rheumatoid arthritis. However, whatever the underlying cause, wearing tight or badly fitting shoes tends to make the problem worse. Wearing such shoes puts extra pressure on the big toe joint and causes friction on the overlying skin.

Symptoms

The main problem is usually the pressure of the shoe over the bony prominence, which causes discomfort or pain. Sometimes the skin over the lump becomes red, blistered or infected. The foot may become so broad that it is difficult to get wide enough shoes. The big toe sometimes tilts over so much that it rubs on the second toe, or pushes it up out of place so it presses on the shoe. Also, the big toe does not work as well with a bunion, and the other toes have to take more of the weight of the body as you walk. This can cause pain under the ball of the foot ("metatarsalgia"). Sometimes arthritis develops in the deformed joint, causing pain in the joint.

Diagnosis

Your doctor can identify a bunion by examining your foot. Watching your big toe as you move it up and down will help your doctor determine if your range of motion is limited. Your doctor will also look for redness or swelling. After the physical exam, an X-ray of your foot can help your doctor identify the cause of the bunion and rate its severity.

Non Surgical Treatment

Wear comfortable shoes that don't squeeze your toes together. Sandals are ideal in warm weather. Cushioning the bunion with a donut-shaped bunion pad sold at drugstores can prevent any direct rubbing against your shoes. Have your shoes stretched to give your foot more room or consider switching to footwear customized to relieve pressure on the affected area. Soak your foot in warm water to help lessen the pain after a day on your feet. Apply ice packs several times a day to reduce swelling of painful and inflamed bunions. Take aspirin or ibuprofen for the inflammation and pain, and try supplementing with anti-inflammatory herbs such as ginger and turmeric (these work more slowly than the drugs). See a podiatrist for specially fitted shoes or orthotic devices that may help. Sometimes, surgery is necessary. Seek a second opinion before scheduling any operation.

Bunion Pain

Surgical Treatment

As mentioned above, with mild cases, the bone is cut close to the big toe joint and shifted over into a correct position. The cut bone is held in placed with one or two surgical screws. With this procedure, just the top of the bone is moved over and the bottom of the bone remains in the same place. This technique is called the Austin bunionectomy and refers to type of bone cut that will be made by the Surgeon. There is, however, a limit on how far one can move the bone over with this technique. Its is generally thought that the cut bone should only be moved over a distance equal to half the width of the bone. In somes the bone may be moved over further.
Remove all ads